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Running Injuries

  • Achilles tendinopathy
  • Plantar fasciopathy
  • Medial tibial stress syndrome/Shin splints
  • Patellofemoral knee joint pain
  • Hamstring tendinopathy

A lot of the above injuries are linked to overloading and repeated force being applied to the lower limb during the action of running; without the correct strength, control and/or flexibility. Physiotherapy strategies would include an initial assessment to identify the factors creating your running problem. Once an assessment is done and a diagnosis is made, management plans would involve manual therapy, taping, ice and advice alongside a specific exercise program tailored to you to keep you running as pain free as possible.

Achilles Tendinopathy

Achilles tendinopathy is a common issue related to ankle stiffness and pain. You may experience pain on the back of your ankle, stiffness or pain in the morning, pain with running and jumping. Physiotherapy management involves looking at your exercise load, recovery time, strength of the calves and foot and ankle biomechanics. Your program will include strengthing your calves and lower leg muscles, retraining your biomechanics and providing you with advice to help you manage the load you are placing on your tendon.

Plantar Fasciopathy

Plantar fasciopathy is one of the most common causes of heel pain. Plantar fascia is the connective tissue that runs under your foot from your heel to the base of your toes. In plantar fasciopathy, the fascia can become inflamed and thick at the insertion at the heel. You may experience soreness and stiffness in the morning and after long periods of non-weight bearing (eg. sitting).

Treatment for plantar fasciopathy includes foot mobilisation to improve your foot biomechanics, manual therapy, taping, balance and awareness exercises, retraining of your muscles and strength training of your leg. If you have been referred to physiotherapy by your podiatrist, we will work in conjunction with them for your best outcome.

Patellofemoral Pain

PFP is a condition where pain is felt on the front of the knee, around or behind the patella. It is commonly felt with activities such as squatting, running, jumping and going up or down stairs and can limit a person’s ability to participate in their chosen activity or work; forms 25–40 percent of all knee presentations to a sports injury clinic, and can affect people of any age, though studies have shown up to one-third of adolescents report PFP. Treatment for PFP includes specific strengthening exercises for the quads and glutes with a focus on correct technique and control. Ice, taping and orthotics can provide short term relief, your physiotherapist can assess with this accordingly.

Hamstring Tendinopathy

Hamstring tendinopathy has some very clear diagnostic criteria, including: pain on the sitting bone, pain with stretching your hamstring and pain with prolonged sitting. Physiotherapy management involves strengthening your gluteal muscles, assessing and retraining your biomechanics, and providing you with advice to help you manage the load you are placing on your tendon.

Practitioners

Dr Kathy Yu M.B.B.S.

Sports Doctor

Stacey Kipouridis APAM

Physiotherapist

Catherine Etty-Leal APAM

Titled Physiotherapist

Andrew Pilcher APAM

Senior Physiotherapist

Annie Strauch APAM

Titled Physiotherapist